Category: stabilizer

How to embroider on really thick fuzzy Christmas Stockings

This is a little easier than you think it would be. The problem is the fabric is so thick that the embroidery foot on the machine doesn’t jump high enough to move to the next spot without snagging. What you need to do is make the fuzzy part temporarily thinner.

Start by putting a tear-away sticky-back stabilizer on the back of the part to be embroidered. On the front use a thick/heavy wash away stabilizer. Using a regular sewing machine run a basting stitch (1/4″ stitch length) up and down the area that will be embroidered. This will tie the two stabilizers together, sandwiching the whole thing into something that will be thin enough to work in the embroidery machine.

Next, hoop up the stocking, pick a design, and start the machine to stitch it out. After the machine finishes all you need to do is remove the base stitches and pull the tear-away stabilizer off. The fabric that was sandwiched together will fluff back up, leaving a very nice design.

Stocking with basting stitches and stabilizer still in place. The machine embroidery has already been finished.

The stabilizer and basting stitches are gone. As you can see, the fuzzy part of the stocking is all fluffed up again.

Placemats, Table Graces

Last year I bought a pattern at Times Square Sewing called Table Graces. This is very easy and fun to do and will make a great wedding or house warming gift. I also think these would be great to do for each holiday. You could have a different set for Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter. They do take a little bit of time to make so you won’t be seeing them on my Ebay site.  If you’re interested in a set, contact me for pricing.

I cut all my fabric out ahead of time. Of course I had to embroider mine so I sewed the fabric right to the stabilizer. This made hooping and centering the design very easy. Next I lay the back and front wrong sides together, placed that on top of the batting and sewed around the outside edge. I left a small opening to turn it right side out and pressed with an iron. I finished by quilting them in the ditch starting at the center and working my way out. I also stitched around the outside about 1/8th of an inch from the edge. This closed up the opening that I had when I turned it right side out.

After it was done I had a great gift. Even a beginner can follow this pattern. This is at the top of my list and a must buy for all quilters. Locally you can pick this up at Times Square in Quincy, IL or you can get it online at QuiltWoman.com.

Neat Stabilizer Trick

(written by Jason)

Alaine figured out a neat trick.  She’s using Janome Wet N’ Set stabilizer when making these bottle aprons and wineglass cozies.  Towards the end of each job, there’s a step where another piece of fabric has to be added to the underside of the existing project.  That doesn’t seem like a big deal until you consider that pretty much all self-stick stabilizer on the market is only self-stick on one side.  So, the general idea is to use the self-stick on the top side, and when that back fabric needs to be added, stick it on with spray-stick adhesive. (more…)